Home » Photographic Film Types: Color Motion Picture Film, Cellulose Acetate Film, Reversal Film, Panchromatic Film, Negative, Tabular-Grain Film by Books LLC
Photographic Film Types: Color Motion Picture Film, Cellulose Acetate Film, Reversal Film, Panchromatic Film, Negative, Tabular-Grain Film Books LLC

Photographic Film Types: Color Motion Picture Film, Cellulose Acetate Film, Reversal Film, Panchromatic Film, Negative, Tabular-Grain Film

Books LLC

Published May 4th 2010
ISBN : 9781155479736
Paperback
48 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Color Motion Picture Film, Cellulose Acetate Film, Reversal Film, Panchromatic Film, Negative, Tabular-Grain Film, Tungsten Film, Dye Coupler, Orthochromatic, Positive-Negative Film. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Not illustrated. FreeMoreChapters: Color Motion Picture Film, Cellulose Acetate Film, Reversal Film, Panchromatic Film, Negative, Tabular-Grain Film, Tungsten Film, Dye Coupler, Orthochromatic, Positive-Negative Film. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Color motion picture film refers to motion pictures in color. The first motion pictures were made with silver halide-based photographic emulsion on a clear base. The resulting image was projected in a range of blacks to whites, depending on the luminous intensity of the original subject. With color motion picture film, not only is the luminance of a subject recorded, but the color of the subject, too. Whether the color is photographed on separate pieces of film or within the same emulsion, all color photography is synthesized through various parts of the image recording discrete spectra of light. The earliest motion picture stocks were orthochromatic nitrate and recorded cyan (blue and green) light, but not red light. Recording all three major wavelengths of light required making film stock panchromatic nitrate to some degree. Since orthochromatic film stock hindered color photography in its beginnings, the first films with color in them utilized aniline dyes in order to create artificial color. Hand-colored films began in 1895 with Thomas Edisons hand-painted Anabelles Dance made for his Kinetoscope viewers. Many of the early filmmakers from the first ten years of film also used this method to some degree. George Melies offered hand-painted prints of his own films at an additional cost over the black and white versions, including the visual-effects pioneering A Trip to the Moon (1902). The film had various parts of the film painted frame-by-frame by twenty-one women in Montreuil in a production-line method. The first co...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=587120