Home » Reimagining the Queen Volume III: Plays and Play Shorts by Patricia J. Woods
Reimagining the Queen Volume III: Plays and Play Shorts Patricia J. Woods

Reimagining the Queen Volume III: Plays and Play Shorts

Patricia J. Woods

Published December 21st 2014
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
90 pages
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 About the Book 

Reimagining the Queen Volume III is a humorous collection of plays delving into conversations between Antony, Cleopatra, Venus, Inanna, Saturn, Neptune, Bacchus, Artemis, and others. Ramases and Jupiter make surprise appearances. The first, a playMoreReimagining the Queen Volume III is a humorous collection of plays delving into conversations between Antony, Cleopatra, Venus, Inanna, Saturn, Neptune, Bacchus, Artemis, and others. Ramases and Jupiter make surprise appearances. The first, a play short, is Antony and Cleopatra. It presents a contemporary dialogue between the two about the death of Christ, who is implied to be Antony himself, and Cleopatra’s continuing rage about it two thousand years later (she is implied to be his wife). While it is humorous, it presents female anger in righteous and divine terms. It also presents Cleopatra as an undyingly faithful wife. The play includes some fairly rousing poetry and poetic dialogue, although mild in today’s terms.The second play is the longest, taking up around 70 per cent of the volume. It is The Council of the Gods. The play begins with a family council being called by Zeus. The family council includes Bacchus (Jupiter and Venus’ father)- Neptune (who may be Venus’ real father)- Inanna (a Persian goddess and mother of Venus in the play)- Venus, Zeus, and their children, Aretmis, Themis, and Anat. Anat is a goddess and daughter of Ashera and El in the Ancient Israelite tradition. Because Inanna is presented as mother to Venus, and Venus is mother to Anat, Venus is implied by family connections to be Ashera and thereby the original Israelite goddess, making her daughter of Inanna and El, although this is unstated. The paternity of the children of Venus is uncertain and changes throughout the play- initially they are presented as Zeus’ children. This family council, it is implied, is the Council of the Gods. The story turns into one centered on an old and on-going love affair between Venus and Jupiter, who left her six thousand years ago. As it turns out, Jupiter is presented as the original progenitor of the Arthur legends of the king who burned his wife at the stake, having mercy on her at the last moment, shooting her through the heart with an arrow before the flames could reach her. This is, in turn, is presented in the story as the true origin of the Cupid stories. (Volume V of Reimagining the Queen offers a Rama and Sita story situated in the Arab-Israeli Conflict- there are some parallels suggested across the volumes between the Rama and Sita cycles and that of Jupiter/Arthur killing Venus/Guinevere on a pit of flame). The play includes a dialogue between Venus and her daughters about the Ancient fertility cults and questions of primogeniture. It has two endings, one in which Venus returns to Jupiter, and one in which she goes to his arch-nemesis, Pharaoh (assumed to be Ramases).The last play, Upper Egypt, is the shortest. It presents Phara (pronounced Fara) and Ramases (who she calls Rama) in a world that is both contemporary and Ancient at the same time. They are in their Ancient palace- however, everything else about the play is contemporary. They are re-meeting after a long time apart and are dealing with competing suitors arriving for the hands of Phara and her daughter, Helena. The suitors include Moses, the King of Troy, the King of Antrim, and others. Phara is married to Ramases. Her full title is presented as Queen, Lady Phara, Hatshepsut (QLPH). Ramases’ full title is Ramases, Pharaoh, Father, & Anubis, Redeemer of the Night (RPFARN).Available exclusively on Kindle. Available on Kindles lending library.